Archive for the ‘Tutorials’ Category

5
Mar

HOBO JOE TUTORIAL

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

  

A tutorial that the WOOD BEE CARVER did for the “Whittle & Chips” blog a few years ago may be viewed by clicking on HOBO JOE link.  The tutorial does a series of step by step photos and verbal descriptions of carving in the Whittle-Carving style of using only knives to carve a figure.  The complete “Whittle and Chips”  blog is listed under Cool Links in the right column on this Home Page.

4
Sep

3 Ways of Learning

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

 

It has been said that there are three ways people learn, that is, they learn by observation, by reading and by touching the wet paint. The same can be said about learning to carve as it is beneficial to be observant, to read and to touch the carving knife to the wood to experience leaning to carve by carving.

Read the rest of this entry »

17
Oct

WHITTLE DWARF Tutorial

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

WHITTLE DWARF TUTORIAL is now available as a PDF document under BEE HIVE in the right column of the Home Page of this blog.  All items in the BEE HIVE are instructional  PDF documents that can be viewed on the computer as well as printed.

24
Jun

TEXTURE IS COLOR

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

                       

                         

Study each of the photographs displayed in this posting to make the comparison between a natural (monochrome) finish of one colored carving with a multi colored (poly-chrome) painted carving side by side. Read the rest of this entry »

11
Jun

WHITTLE-CARVING Method

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

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The WOOD BEE CARVER is primarily a knife carver who practices a method for opening up a block of wood using only knives to shape and detail a subject to its completion.  The most efficient use of a knife is to do slicing cuts either in the push or pull stroke.  A slicing cut is what is used to slice a tomato, loaf of bread and baloney which is the same action for carving wood with a knife.  Often the action is a “slice and roll” movement of the cutting edge of the knife through the wood using as much of the blade as possible for most cuts. Sometimes the front end of the blade is used more than the entire length but in all cases the slicing action is preferred for efficiency and clean cuts. Read the rest of this entry »

13
May

WHITTLE FOLK MONKS ~ Redux

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

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Whittle Folk Monks are three-inch-tall characters that are subjects used for instructional purposes as a beginning carving project that were introduced in 2009 [click on MONKS 1  and  MONKS 2 for earlier postings.] The photos above show the front view and the back view of the row of monks in their finished poses of the 2017 versions of Monks. Read the rest of this entry »

29
Jan

EYE STUDY ~ in Glasses

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

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Carving eyes is always a challenge that gives the carver the opportunity to experiment and practice in order to find a method that will work for the carver.  The WOOD BEE CARVER is primarily a knife carver who carves eyes using a combination of three cut triangular cuts, notch cuts and delicate slicing cuts.  Carving eyes underneath carved glasses presents another step in the challenge of eye carving and yet the same basic method works the same.  The photo above shows two faces, one with the form of glasses with a blank flat plane and the second with eyes carved through the frame of the glasses. The left face with the flat plane glasses illustrates the carving of the basic form of the glasses fitted on the face. The right face with the eyes carved inside and behind the frame of the glasses illustrates the end result. Read the rest of this entry »

26
Jan

BLOCK HEAD CARVING

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

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The term “BLOCK HEAD CARVING” is coined to describe the carving process of carving from a “block” of wood and using one’s “head” in the carving process to shape the wood into a carving project.  The use of “head” refers to the carver’s imagination partnering with the carver’s creative carving ability to figure out how to carve an envisioned image.  This approach of opening up a block of wood being guided by imagination is to discover in the shaping process the “design by carving”.  Often in the process of removing wood chips the remaining carved facets on the shaped block will suggest an innovation in design of the envisioned image. Read the rest of this entry »