Archive for the ‘Carving Projects’ Category

26
Jun

THE DARK SIDE

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

The Wood Bee Carver is primarily a knife carver and the carving classes he taught over the years before he retired from teaching at the end of 2019 were “knife only” classes.  With tongue in cheek I would warn students that if I caught them using a gouge or V tool on class projects or even heard of such tools other that a knife being used I would confiscate those tools.  That branch of humor was revived in later years to refer to the use of any carving tool other that a knife would be “carving on the Dark Side.”

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19
Jun

MINIATURE WHITTLE FOLK GNOMES

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

The two-inch-tall miniature Whittle Folk Gnomes are the latest version of the original Whittle Folk Gnomes who came into being around 2008 or 2009 as a three-inch-tall figure. In the PHOTO TRAILS box under the MAIN MENU box, click on “Whittle Folk Gnomes” to see a photo display of the original Gnomes.

 

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15
May

WHITTLE FOLK BUSTS

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

Whittle Folk Busts originated in 1994 as a carving project that carved a face on the corner of a three inch by inch square block of basswood with a variety of themed subjects. An article was written in Chip Chats about that time to offer instructional guidelines for this carving project using only knives.

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27
Feb

THREE AMIGOS II

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

                     

The photo above is of the Three Amigos ~ Rusty, Crusty and Dusty.  The first versions of these Cowpokes carved in 2009 can be viewed by clicking on THREE AMIGOS.  In this version presented here represents a 2021 interpretation with slight variations in age and color of their outfits.  A tutorial for carving Crusty may be viewed by clicking on Carving a Cowpoke. The tutorial can be adapted for carving any cowpoke with slight adjustments in pose, outfits and hand positions.

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21
Feb

DOODLE DOODS

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

Doodle Doods came into being as a byproduct of demonstration carvings done by the instructor in many classes over the years.  The demonstration was part of a lesson on teaching the planes and angles of a male face as they fit into the Rule of Three of Facial proportions. The photo below shows the progression from a block of wood to a carved face.

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16
Feb

PHOTO TUTORIAL ~ CARVING A COWPOKE

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

This series of photographs presents a brief visual tutorial on the opening phase of carving a Cowpoke which can be applied to any Cowpoke.

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16
Feb

HAROLD ENLOW Rough Out

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

Harold Enlow is perhaps the one name that is synonymous with caricature carving as a carver, author and instructor.  His knowledge of carving is only surpassed by his quick wit and down to earth out going personality. For over fifteen years I have possessed one of his rough outs of a hillbilly couple.  Well, here it is 2021 and I finally got around to carving and painting this rough out.  There is little to be said about this carving that can be added to what the carving says in its visual presentation. The photos allow the carving to speak for itself as a Harold Enlow design interpreted by the Wood Bee Carver. Thank you, Harold.

                              

26
Dec

PIRATE REVISITED

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

                           

A pirate has been a frequent carving project in which each new pirate carving is an interpretation of a familiar theme.  Most pirate carvings have repeating themes of an eye patch, hook, peg leg, sword, craggy face with scars, skull with cross bones insignia and clothes that are representative of a pirate.  Sometimes a braided pig tail will be added and perhaps rings in the ears.  All in all, a pirate is fun to carve because of all the features that add to the carving challenges.  The pirate featured in this posting include most of these characteristics.

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