Archive for the ‘Tu Tor Plus’ Category

19
Feb

SOFT WHITTLING ~ A Tutorial

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

Barney with WBC-1 KnifeBarneyBarney

The WOOD BEE CARVER  is primarily a knife carver who has developed a style of carving called “Whittle-Carving” to imply carving using only a knife.  The most efficient use of a carving knife is to utilize a slicing cut as often as possible.  A slicing cut is similar to slicing bread, slicing steak or the action of the guillotine’s skewed blade slicing as it slides down the track of the guillotine.  The cutting edge of a knife is made up of very small cutting teeth similar to teeth on a hand saw and it is these teeth when used in the slicing action that separates the wood fibers for a clean cut.  Using the knife blade with a wedge cut crushes fibers before the edge cuts the fibers resulting in a fuzzy and cloudy surface.  A slicing cut creates a clean and slick surface.  The scimitar blade shape with its curved cutting edge slices in both the push and pull stroke.  It can also make slicing cuts upside down and sideways as well as right side up. The concave shape of the back of the scimitar blade allows for reaching into tight areas where another blade shape would be impaired. Read the rest of this entry »

29
Jul

EGG NOGGIN STUDY

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

   

Basswood hen eggs provide a challenging medium for carving imaginative projects.  The challenge is to carve a variety of subjects out of the unique shape of a hen egg.  The egg shape lends itself to carving faces since the human face fits well within the oval egg shape.  The shape also allows for the carving of the upper torso and head of a figure without legs as an elongated bust. Read the rest of this entry »

19
Jul

HAND STUDY

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

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Hand StudyNext to carving eyes and next to carving the human face, carving hands can be a challenge to carvers.  Hiding hands in a pocket is the easy way out and the quickest way to produce a boring carving.  Like any other carving project, carving hands is a matter of first taking a good look at hands, studying hands and then practice carving hands on a scrap piece of wood.  These “scrapper” lessons are beneficial in the long run. Read the rest of this entry »

18
Jul

Short Tutorial

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

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First things first are always important in the carving process.  Carving a good foundation of the basic form first allows the details to be carved in their proper places.  These four photographs show “carved to form” caricatures ready for detail carving to take place.  The first two photographs show a block of basswood having the top corners rounded into a dowel shape to receive the hat and head of the caricature as well as the back of the arms and shoulder area sliced forward on the back side of the block.  Each block is standing profile with a “carved to form” caricature for comparison.  The next two photographs show four “carved to form” caricatures to be studied as a short tutorial in “form ready for detail.” The lesson of this “Short Tutorial” is that there are no short cuts to carving the details.  First the form and then the detail.

13
Apr

RULE OF THREE PROPORTIONS

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

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8
Feb

RULE OF THREE- Eye and Mouth

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

Rick Jensen is a good carving friend who is known among carving circles for his expertise in carving and teaching how to carve whimsical houses out of cottonwood bark.  He teaches all around the nation and has authored a book entitled “Carving Tree Bark.”   He is a popular teacher who has influenced untold number of students who go on to create their own unique designs of tree bark houses.  His fun loving personality, good sense of humor and generosity of spirit endears him to all who call him friend and beloved carver.  When I asked him if I could use his image for an instructional posting he more than graciously agreed which is just like his passion for encouraging carvers to experience the joy and satisfaction of carving.  He is sometimes known by his nick name of “Bark Boy” but even more he is known as a respected carver, teacher, judge and all around nice guy.  In studying his face in the photograph one will notice a strong face with character and a smile of friendly welcome. Read the rest of this entry »

1
Feb

A PLANE FACE

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

Artist author and instructor Andrew Loomis influenced several generations of budding artists and his work still is influential.  The plate to the left is one of his illustrations of facial planes to help in viewing the basic shape of the human face.  If one is to become comfortable with carving faces in wood, one needs to be able to see the human face in various ways to fix an image in the mind.  It is part of what I mean when I say, “Think inside the Block,” (the Block Head as well as the Block of wood)  as being able to see in the mind first the basic shape of the human face.  It is the mental image that guides the carving hands and tool to shape the wood into a human face.  By using a study of facial planes both visually and carving facial planes the carver will be able to carve to shape a face that looks natural and pleasing. Read the rest of this entry »

4
Jan

EGG NOGGINS

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

 

 

 

EGG NOGGINS  are heads and faces carved out of a basswood hen egg to be used as a bottle stopper, a bobble head, mounted on a base or free standing on its bottom (as in the first photogrpah on the left.)   The variety of faces to be carved is under the freedom of imagination and the experimentation of the carver.  Egg Noggins are excellent for the practice of carving faces since the head and face is basically round and egg shaped.  Basswood hen eggs cost  an average of one dollar each from woodcarving vendors through their catalog or at woodcarving shows as well as Woodcraft stores. Also use only basswood hen eggs as some eggs are made from harder wood making for difficulty in the carving process.    Read the rest of this entry »