Archive for the ‘Hobos’ Category

15
Jun

GUNNY SACK GLENN

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

Gunny Sack Glenn is another example of  a Hobo caricature carving that has all the characteristics of a hobo with well worn, torn and patched clothing that is mis-matched and toes coming out of a shoe.

The first series of photographs show two hobos carved to the basic form along with the finished hobo.  The purpose of such a photographic study is to carve with imagination  in the viewer’s mind that which is between the form and the completed carving.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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27
Mar

HOBOS FOUR

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

Hobos have a nostalgic appeal of an earlier time when itinerant labors traveled the country looking for work.  Their clothes were torn, tattered and well worn while their faces were road mapped with heavy road weary lines of a hard way of life. The Four Hobos in the picture on the left are carved caricatures whose names are left to right: Suds Larry, Soup Bone, Gunny Sack and Sulky Sal.

In spite of it all there was something romantic about  these knights of the road that gave a wanderlust appearance of an easy go lucky  way of life while there was none in reality.

A Hobo would travel looking for work while a Tramp simply traveled not looking for work and a Bum would neither travel nor look for work possessing only a hard luck story to con easy money.  The Hobo was the “common stiff” who was somebody’s friend, acquaintance or relative who showed up from time to time of itinerant travels following news of the next job. Read the rest of this entry »

15
Apr

CLASSIC HOBO

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

CLASSIC HOBO CLASSIC HOBOCLASSIC HOBOCLASSIC HOBO

The Classic Hobo is classic by his appearance of well worn face, tattered clothing and the far off and wondering look in his eye. Read the rest of this entry »

14
Mar

HOBO FACES STUDY

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

ELMERELMERELMERRUBERUBERUBECEDRICKCEDRICKCEDRICKCEDRICKCEDRICKCEDRICKHALF PINTHALF PINTHALF PINTHALF PINTHALF PINTHALF PINT

“A picture is worth a thousand words,” and sometimes looking at the pictures tells more than what can be read.  Thus this HOBO FACES STUDY is just that, a study of pictures, so click on each one to enlarge to study the features and look for how the face was proportioned using the RULE OF THREE as discussed in the three previous posts. Keep in mind that each of these hobos were carved using only a knife in a style I call “Whittle-Carving.”

12
Mar

CARVING HOBO HALF PINT

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

THREE HOBOSIn the two previous posts Rube and Cedrick were introduced.  They stand five inches tall and are now joined by Half Pint who stands two inches including the base he is standing on.  Half Pint is the same design and pose of Rube and Cedrick and the RULE OF THREE was used on Half Pint to maintain body and facial proportions.

 

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2
Mar

CARVING HOBO CEDRICK

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

SAGE OF THE ROADHOBO RUBEIn every block of wood there is a carving subject waiting to be set free by carving away all the wood that does not look like the subject imagined.  Or so the old saying goes.

Such is the case of the subject of carving a hobo envisioned in a block of wood.  The first photo shows Sage of the Road standing in front of a basswood block.  Sage was used as a model for the Hobo Rube whose story was told in the February  26, 2009 posting of “Carving Hobo Rube.”  The second photo shows Rube standing in front of a block of basswood from which Hobo Cedrick will be carved in this posting. Read the rest of this entry »

26
Feb

CARVING HOBO RUBE

   Posted by: woodbeecarver

SAGE OF THE ROADSage of the Road is a hobo carving that is serving as a model for another hobo carving of Rube who will be carved out of the basswood block standing behind Sage of the Road. The block is five inches tall by two and a half inches square.  Hobos are nostalgic and romantic figures of a by-gone era that some call the “good ole days.”

Hobos began around the American Civil War and were itinerant labors who traveled all over the country in search of adventure as well as work.  It has been said that a “hobo is one who travels for work, a tramp travels but will not work and a bum neither travels nor works.”  Some say that the term “hobo” is a shortened version of “hoe boy” or an itinerant farm laborer who carried his hoe with his bindle bag tied to the hoe handle.  Read the rest of this entry »